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What are you thankful for today??
#21
(26-11-2021, 02:44 PM)crafters_corner Wrote:
(26-11-2021, 02:36 PM)Lilith7 Wrote: I think that's one of the best things about the world we live in now; that men are able to & want to, take on more of the parenting role than formerly. I think it benefits the entire family to have a proper dad rather than a distant father figure who's always away at work. Smile
Yes indeed, it's been one of the upsides to covid I think. The young couple in front of me, are having their second baby at the end of January, and the dad was saying that he's so excited. I thought 'how cool is that'. It's so lovely to hear men being so vocal about his excitement.

Our dad's were always away at work lilith. I can remember when Dad would come home from work, and it was exciting to see him. Being the only girl, I was a daddy's girl, and I am so proud to have had a Dad who was a hard worker and provided for his family.
  There were some families then whose Mums would tell the kids to 'wait till your father comes home'  if they misbehaved, & if they'd done something really naughty, those kids would be in for a hiding. Usually known as 'a bloody good hiding' back then.
You never saw a bloke pushing a pram then, either - & if one did well then, he was probably some kind of sissy.
Its a good thing that those days are gone.
in order to be old & wise, you must first be young & stupid. (I'm still working on that.)
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#22
(26-11-2021, 02:50 PM)Lilith7 Wrote:
(26-11-2021, 02:44 PM)crafters_corner Wrote: Yes indeed, it's been one of the upsides to covid I think. The young couple in front of me, are having their second baby at the end of January, and the dad was saying that he's so excited. I thought 'how cool is that'. It's so lovely to hear men being so vocal about his excitement.

Our dad's were always away at work lilith. I can remember when Dad would come home from work, and it was exciting to see him. Being the only girl, I was a daddy's girl, and I am so proud to have had a Dad who was a hard worker and provided for his family.
  There were some families then whose Mums would tell the kids to 'wait till your father comes home'  if they misbehaved, & if they'd done something really naughty, those kids would be in for a hiding. Usually known as 'a bloody good hiding' back then.
You never saw a bloke pushing a pram then, either - & if one did well then, he was probably some kind of sissy.
Its a good thing that those days are gone.
My Dad was a very gentle soul, but I remember as a child, him giving my brother a thrashing. It was just awful. My bro was a complete shit as a kid, and Dad must have thought he deserved it.

Parents know better these days, thank goodness. Times have changed so much, and yes, changes for the better.
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#23
(26-11-2021, 02:57 PM)crafters_corner Wrote:
(26-11-2021, 02:50 PM)Lilith7 Wrote:   There were some families then whose Mums would tell the kids to 'wait till your father comes home'  if they misbehaved, & if they'd done something really naughty, those kids would be in for a hiding. Usually known as 'a bloody good hiding' back then.
You never saw a bloke pushing a pram then, either - & if one did well then, he was probably some kind of sissy.
Its a good thing that those days are gone.
My Dad was a very gentle soul, but I remember as a child, him giving my brother a thrashing. It was just awful. My bro was a complete shit as a kid, and Dad must have thought he deserved it.

Parents know better these days, thank goodness. Times have changed so much, and yes, changes for the better.


Yes, I think we're gradually working out better ways to cope with bringing up kids - we're slow learners, we humans. Rolleyes Big Grin
in order to be old & wise, you must first be young & stupid. (I'm still working on that.)
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#24
Today, I am thankful for...

Peace and quiet, and listening to the birds chirping away

Living alone

Living in NZ

The awesome tmmb members. You are all great to be around.

My girl pussycat. She is the sweetest thing, and we love each other madly.
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#25
That at least one of the Xmas books I bought online turned up, & that I managed to get bread, there & back this morning before it rained.
in order to be old & wise, you must first be young & stupid. (I'm still working on that.)
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#26
Today my blackbird came back as I dealt to nearly the last of the compost bin. I am very grateful for his trust. And yes, I found him a big fat snail.
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#27
i cannot remember ever being hit by my parents. ever.
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#28
I'm thankful -
that I was finally able to book a hairdressing appointment for 17 December. I really didn't think I would be able to get an appointment before Christmas.

That I have two healthy children and one healthy granddaughter.

That I have a whole library of books that I have built up over the years and still have good enough eyesight (with glasses) to read my way through them. Just hope I have enough years left to get through them all.

That I'm 3 weeks into an attack of Shingles and pain seems to be easing.
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#29
Oh no, that's awful. My sister had it so when the vax came out I was in like a shot to get that. Apparently it needs renewal five yearly, so I have that diarised for me at the surgery. My inner wimp doesn't fancy it at all...
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#30
(27-11-2021, 03:10 PM)Oh_hunnihunni Wrote: Oh no, that's awful. My sister had it so when the vax came out I was in like a shot to get that. Apparently it needs renewal five yearly, so I have that diarised for me at the surgery. My inner wimp doesn't fancy it at all...

I had the Zostavax vaccine three and a half years ago but was told at the time that it was probably only about 50% effective. So I was a bit surprised to get it but I believe there is a better vaccine available now called Shingrix. I'm assuming the attack may have been worse if I hadn't had the vaccine. It also coincided with having to look after granddaughter as her mum went back to work (from home) 2 weeks ago. I'm looking forward to getting over it - may be another 2 weeks - to get my energy back, as I'm exhausted at the moment! Fingers crossed that you don't get it, Oh_hunnihunni.
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#31
Shingrix sounds like an asian language
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#32
(27-11-2021, 02:39 PM)Outsider Wrote: I'm thankful -
that I was finally able to book a hairdressing appointment for 17 December. I really didn't think I would be able to get an appointment before Christmas.

That I have two healthy children and one healthy granddaughter.

That I have a whole library of books that I have built up over the years and still have good enough eyesight (with glasses) to read my way through them. Just hope I have enough years left to get through them all.

That I'm 3 weeks into an attack of Shingles and pain seems to be easing.
Oh no, shingles is a terrible thing.

My friend in Oz had it, just on a year ago, she developed it, and she is still suffering the affects of it. She has areas around her hips and down one leg, that don't have alot of feeling in them. She was so happy recently, when she realised she could feel the warm shower on that area. She suffers alot of pain still, and can barely move around.

She was one of the very unlucky ones, who got the worst strain of shingles. It has been a long road for her, and she doesn't think that she will ever return to normal now.

Getting the shingles vaccine is the best thing to do, to be sure you don't ever get this terrible thing.
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#33
I had the vaccine against shingles a while ago; apparently if you've had chicken pox that increases the risk of getting shingles & I'd had chicken pox, as well as everything else that was going round back then.
And I decided that 50% effective was better than nothing; I've heard that shingles can be awful.
in order to be old & wise, you must first be young & stupid. (I'm still working on that.)
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#34
(27-11-2021, 03:41 PM)crafters_corner Wrote:
(27-11-2021, 02:39 PM)Outsider Wrote: I'm thankful -
that I was finally able to book a hairdressing appointment for 17 December. I really didn't think I would be able to get an appointment before Christmas.

That I have two healthy children and one healthy granddaughter.

That I have a whole library of books that I have built up over the years and still have good enough eyesight (with glasses) to read my way through them. Just hope I have enough years left to get through them all.

That I'm 3 weeks into an attack of Shingles and pain seems to be easing.
Oh no, shingles is a terrible thing.

My friend in Oz had it, just on a year ago, she developed it, and she is still suffering the affects of it. She has areas around her hips and down one leg, that don't have alot of feeling in them. She was so happy recently, when she realised she could feel the warm shower on that area. She suffers alot of pain still, and can barely move around.

She was one of the very unlucky ones, who got the worst strain of shingles. It has been a long road for her, and she doesn't think that she will ever return to normal now.

Getting the shingles vaccine is the best thing to do, to be sure you don't ever get this terrible thing.

Your poor friend obviously has the complication that I was told about by the doctor - Post-herpetic neuropathy which happens to about 20% of Shingles sufferers. But the good news is that the pain can disappear after a year, so hope she's one of those that recover completely. After my experience I would advise everyone to get vaccinated if they are over 70. My husband is being stubborn because he says he can't remember having chicken pox, but surely most children would have had chicken pox in the 1950s?
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#35
I certainly did, as did my sister. That's one other reason I got the vax. Might ask about the other one though next time I go to my GP...
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#36
Apparently the virus that causes chickenpox (herpes zoster) remains latent after the initial infection subsides and is held in check by your immune system. As your immune system slows with age the virus can again gain the upper hand and shingles results.

It would appear that the influence of the Pfizer COVID vaccine can also tip the balance in favour of the zoster vrus as Shingles is one of the prevalent Adverse Events of Special Interest reported by Medsafe. Also the shingles vaccine is the one vaccine that it is advised that shouldn't be administered in combination or close to the COVID one.
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#37
(28-11-2021, 10:40 AM)harm_less Wrote: Apparently the virus that causes chickenpox (herpes zoster) remains latent after the initial infection subsides and is held in check by your immune system. As your immune system slows with age the virus can again gain the upper hand and shingles results.

It would appear that the influence of the Pfizer COVID vaccine can also tip the balance in favour of the zoster vrus as Shingles is one of the prevalent Adverse Events of Special Interest reported by Medsafe. Also the shingles vaccine is the one vaccine that it is advised that shouldn't be administered in combination or close to the COVID one.

Yes, I read that about the Covid vaccine affecting things, which I can understand, because it would probably stir things up a bit in the body and 'wake up' the zoster virus. I hope someone is taking note of the number of people that get shingles after having the Covid vaccine.
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#38
All the herpes viruses are lingerers that hide in the nerve cells, hence the long term neuropathy type effects. Nasty little beasts that most people harbour at least one or two varieties of...

(28-11-2021, 10:44 AM)Outsider Wrote:
(28-11-2021, 10:40 AM)harm_less Wrote: Apparently the virus that causes chickenpox (herpes zoster) remains latent after the initial infection subsides and is held in check by your immune system. As your immune system slows with age the virus can again gain the upper hand and shingles results.

It would appear that the influence of the Pfizer COVID vaccine can also tip the balance in favour of the zoster vrus as Shingles is one of the prevalent Adverse Events of Special Interest reported by Medsafe. Also the shingles vaccine is the one vaccine that it is advised that shouldn't be administered in combination or close to the COVID one.

Yes, I read that about the Covid vaccine affecting things, which I can understand, because it would probably stir things up a bit in the body and 'wake up' the zoster virus. I hope someone is taking note of the number of people that get shingles after having the Covid vaccine.
Stress hormones also wake these up, as anyone prone to cold sores can relate,  so I wouldn't be surprised if lockdowns and other pandemic strategies also figure in a higher incidence.
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#39
(28-11-2021, 10:44 AM)Outsider Wrote:
(28-11-2021, 10:40 AM)harm_less Wrote: Apparently the virus that causes chickenpox (herpes zoster) remains latent after the initial infection subsides and is held in check by your immune system. As your immune system slows with age the virus can again gain the upper hand and shingles results.

It would appear that the influence of the Pfizer COVID vaccine can also tip the balance in favour of the zoster vrus as Shingles is one of the prevalent Adverse Events of Special Interest reported by Medsafe. Also the shingles vaccine is the one vaccine that it is advised that shouldn't be administered in combination or close to the COVID one.

Yes, I read that about the Covid vaccine affecting things, which I can understand, because it would probably stir things up a bit in the body and 'wake up' the zoster virus. I hope someone is taking note of the number of people that get shingles after having the Covid vaccine.
The link that I posted above shows reported cases (bottom of page) but interestingly Jesse Mulligan mentioned on his RadioNZ show that he had suffered a dose of shingles recently and had it diagnosed by his GP who also saw fit to not acknowledge the event being associated with Jesse having been vaccinated prior to the affliction occurring. You've got to therefore wonder how many 'Events of Interest' go unreported.
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#40
(28-11-2021, 10:22 AM)Outsider Wrote:
(27-11-2021, 03:41 PM)crafters_corner Wrote: Oh no, shingles is a terrible thing.

My friend in Oz had it, just on a year ago, she developed it, and she is still suffering the affects of it. She has areas around her hips and down one leg, that don't have alot of feeling in them. She was so happy recently, when she realised she could feel the warm shower on that area. She suffers alot of pain still, and can barely move around.

She was one of the very unlucky ones, who got the worst strain of shingles. It has been a long road for her, and she doesn't think that she will ever return to normal now.

Getting the shingles vaccine is the best thing to do, to be sure you don't ever get this terrible thing.

Your poor friend obviously has the complication that I was told about by the doctor - Post-herpetic neuropathy which happens to about 20% of Shingles sufferers. But the good news is that the pain can disappear after a year, so hope she's one of those that recover completely. After my experience I would advise everyone to get vaccinated if they are over 70. My husband is being stubborn because he says he can't remember having chicken pox, but surely most children would have had chicken pox in the 1950s?
Yes, it is the post herpetic neuropathy that my friend suffers now. Her doctor did tell her that it would take a year, and it's just on a year now, and she's really not improved alot. She can feel that her body won't ever be right again.  It has been heartbreaking to know she is going through this, and I can't help her, as we are very close...she is like a sister.

Today, I am thankful for..

The love of a beautiful Dad, who was my hero (along with my Mum). It would be my Dad's 97th birthday today. I miss you so much Dad.Sad

Being blessed with the best parents a girl could wish for. The cultural mix has made for an interesting life.

Being able to cry when I need to.

All the amazing people who I encounter on my interactions with other crafters on TM.

Simply being alive. What a privilege.
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